Metformin precautions

Posted: MadGAVR Date: 14-Feb-2019
<i>Metformin</i> Oral Uses, Side Effects, Interactions.

Metformin Oral Uses, Side Effects, Interactions.

Metformin belongs to the class of medications called oral hypoglycemics, which are medications that lower blood sugar. It is used to control blood glucose (blood sugar) for people with type 2 diabetes. It is used when diet, exercise, and weight reduction have not been found to lower blood glucose well enough on their own. Metformin works by reducing the amount of glucose made by the liver and by making it easier for glucose to enter into the tissues of the body. Metformin has been found to be especially useful in delaying problems associated with diabetes for overweight people with diabetes. This medication may be available under multiple brand names and/or in several different forms. Any specific brand name of this medication may not be available in all of the forms or approved for all of the conditions discussed here. Metformin is a prescription drug used to treat type 2 diabetes. It belongs to a class of medications called biguanides. People with type 2 diabetes have blood sugar (glucose) levels that rise higher than normal. Instead, it helps lower your blood sugar levels to a safe range. This may make you wonder what side effects it can cause. Metformin can cause mild and serious side effects, which are the same in men and women. Here’s what you need to know about these side effects and when you should call your doctor. Find out: Can metformin be used to treat type 1 diabetes? These can occur when you first start taking metformin, but usually go away over time. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or cause a problem for you.

<i>Metformin</i> - Side Effects, Uses, Dosage, Overdose, Pregnancy.

Metformin - Side Effects, Uses, Dosage, Overdose, Pregnancy.

Rarely, too much metformin can build up in the body and cause a serious (sometimes fatal) condition called lactic acidosis. Lactic acidosis is more likely if you are an older adult, if you have kidney or liver disease, dehydration, heart failure, heavy alcohol use, if you have surgery, if you have X-ray or scanning procedures that use iodinated contrast, or if you are using certain drugs. For some conditions, your doctor may tell you to stop taking this medication for a short time. Stop taking this medication and get medical help right away if you have any symptoms of lactic acidosis, such as unusual tiredness, dizziness, severe drowsiness, chills, blue/cold skin, muscle pain, fast/difficult breathing, slow/irregular heartbeat, or stomach pain with nausea/vomiting/diarrhea. Show More Metformin is used with a proper diet and exercise program and possibly with other medications to control high blood sugar. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Metformin works by helping to restore your body's proper response to the insulin you naturally produce. It also decreases the amount of sugar that your liver makes and that your stomach/intestines absorb. Read the Patient Information Leaflet if available from your pharmacist before you start taking metformin and each time you get a refill. Metformin is used to treat high blood sugar levels that are caused by a type of diabetes mellitus or sugar diabetes called type 2 diabetes. With this type of diabetes, insulin produced by the pancreas is not able to get sugar into the cells of the body where it can work properly. Using metformin alone, with a type of oral antidiabetic medicine called a sulfonylurea, or with insulin, will help to lower blood sugar when it is too high and help restore the way you use food to make energy. Many people can control type 2 diabetes with diet and exercise. Following a specially planned diet and exercise will always be important when you have diabetes, even when you are taking medicines. To work properly, the amount of metformin you take must be balanced against the amount and type of food you eat and the amount of exercise you do. If you change your diet or exercise, you will want to test your blood sugar to find out if it is too low.

<i>Metformin</i> - Medsafe

Metformin - Medsafe

It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits, especially during the first few weeks that you take this medicine. Blood and urine tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects. This medicine may interact with the dye used for an X-ray or CT scan. Your doctor should advise you to stop taking it before you have any medical exams or diagnostic tests that might cause less urine output than usual. You may be advised to start taking the medicine again 48 hours after the exams or tests if your kidney function is tested and found to be normal. Make sure any doctor or dentist who treats you knows that you are using this medicine. You may need to stop using this medicine several days before having surgery or medical tests. Treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus ,particularly in overweight patients, when dietary management and exercise alone does not result in adequate glycaemic control. • In adults,metformin 850mg tablets may be used as monotherapy or in combination with other oral anti-diabetic agents, or with insulin. • In children from 10 years of age and adolescents, Metformin tablets may be used as monotherapy or in combination with insulin. A reduction of diabetic complications has been shown in overweight type 2 diabetic patients treated with metformin as first-line therapy after diet failure (see 5.1 pharmacodynamic properties). Adults: Adults with normal renal function (GFR≥ 90 m L/min) Monotherapy and combination with other oral antidiabetic agents: • The usual starting dose is one tablet 2 or 3 times daily given during or after meals. After 10 to 15 days the dose should be adjusted on the basis of blood glucose measurements. A slow increase of dose may improve gastrointestinal tolerability.

<b>Metformin</b> Oral Route <b>Precautions</b> - Mayo Clinic
Metformin Oral Route Precautions - Mayo Clinic

Precautions. Drug information provided by IBM. Under certain conditions, too much metformin can cause lactic acidosis. The symptoms of lactic acidosis are. A. Sitagliptin phosphate hydrate b. Vildagliptin c. Vildagliptin/Metformin hydrochloride. Safety measure. Precautions should be revised in the package insert.

Metformin precautions
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